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Metals, Nonmetals, Metalloids

Unit 2 Chapters 1 & 2 (CSI Text)

Unit 4 chapter 12 (Glencoe Text)

4 weeks

 

Objectives:

          Understand that God created metals, nonmetals, and metalloids with common attributes.

          Identify physical and chemical properties of metals, non-metals, and metalloids.

          Define ores and identify where ores are found.

          Identify different substances composing ores.

          Identify the elements in the family of alkali metals and the alkaline-earth metals.

          Identify primary characteristics of the elements in the alkali family and the alkaline-earth family.

          Discuss the properties of hydrogen.

          Name the noble gases and identify their practical uses.

          Use the scientific method for problem solving.

 

Minimum points needed for each week to attain A, B, or C.

 

 

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

For A

50

100

150

200

For B

45

90

135

175

For C

40

80

120

150

 

Please note that the points for each activity represent the maximum number of points that you can get for each activity. Each activity must be done thoroughly and correctly to get the maximum number of points.

 

This is a test grade.

 

Choose any number of activities for a grade of C

Total number of points must total at least 130 points

Choose 1 for

a grade of B

Choose 1 for

a grade of A

30 point activities: You must do one 30 point activity.

          Take notes on each section of the chapter (CSI text). Answer the review questions.

          Take notes on each section of the chapter (Glencoe text). Answer the review questions.

          Take a quiz for each separate section of the CSI text.

 

20 point activities:

          Keep an organized notebook of all your activities. This sheet should be the title page of the notebook.

          From the Handout Box: Mystery Element

          You are shown 2 samples of phosphorous. One is white and burns if exposed to air. The other is red and burns if lit. Research and explain why the properties of these two samples of the same element differ.

 

15 point activities:

          Make vocabulary flash cards and learn the definitions from either text. Oral defense.

          What is a hydride? What are its practical applications?

          Describe how neon lights are made.

          Make a short time line of the discovery of neon gases.

          Read Psalm 119:119a; Proverbs 25:4-5; and Malachi 3:2-3. What do these passages mean? Why did the writers of the Bible use these images?

          Make a collage showing the properties and uses of alkali metals. Please draw the pictures or use photographs that you shoot. Use all the alkali metals in the collage.

          Make a collage showing the properties and uses of alkaline-earth metals. Please draw the pictures or use photographs that you shoot. Use all the alkaline-earth metals in the collage.

          Chose a metal from the periodic table and research it. Tell how many valence electrons it has and how malleable and ductile it is compared to other metals. Describe how it conducts heat and electricity compared to other metals and its common uses.

 

10 Point activities:

          We encounter examples of metals nearly everywhere. Write a paragraph describing how a specific metallic element has an effect in your life. Which group is that metal in on the periodic table?

          Compounds called chlorofluorocarbons are used in refrigeration systems. If released, these compounds destroy ozone in the atmosphere. Draw the electron dot diagram for CF2Cl2 .

          Prepare a bar graph comparing 10 nonmetals and nonmetals boiling and melting points.

          We encounter examples of metals nearly everywhere. Write a paragraph describing how a specific metallic element has an effect in your life. Which group is that metal in on the periodic table?

          Prepare a bar graph comparing 10 nonmetals and nonmetals boiling and melting points.

          Write a paragraph discussing the term valuable when applied to an element. Consider rarity, usefulness, and durability.

          Design a piece of pottery and describe the methods and glazes you would you would use to produce your finished look. (p. 354 Glencoe)

          Discuss why mercury was used for clinical thermometers and why it is no longer used for that purpose.

          When doctors prescribe a low salt diet, they often suggest KCl as a salt substitute. Why does K work as a substitute for NA?

          Write and illustrate a comic strip about hydrogen that conveys its properties.

          Draw a diagram that explains why nonmetals typically have negative charges when combined with metals.

          From the handout box.

        Americium and Smoke Detectors

        Metallic Bonding

        Claiming Earths Aluminum

        Allotropes of Carbon

        Chapter Review Elements and Their Properties

        Gold Rush in the Forest

        How much is your Penny Worth?

        Metal Cautions in Nutrition

        The Halogens

        Naming New Elements

        Reinforcement Nonmetals

        Reinforcement New Elements, New Properties

        Study Guide -- Metals

 

5 point activities:

          Write a paragraph describing what Haggai 2:8&9 and Isaiah 64:8 have to do with metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.

          Complete Metals with Memory on page 335 in Glencoe.

          Explain why oxygen and nitrogen occur in the air as diatomic molecules, but argon, neon, krypton, and xenon occur as single atoms.

          The density of hydrogen is so low that is can be used to fill balloons to make them lighter than air. Why is helium used more frequently?

          Aluminum is close to carbon on the periodic table. Explain why aluminum is a metal and carbon is not.

          From the Handout Box.

        Light Metals

        Properties of Americium

        Diamond and Graphite

        Dietary Allowances of Minerals

        Concept Mapping Elements and Their Properties

        ReinforcementMetals

        Reinforcement Mixed Groups

        Study Guide New Elements, New Properties

        Study Guide Nonmetals

        Study Guide Mixed Groups

Each activity is 30 points:

 

Conduct one of these labs:

 

1)       Lets find out p92 in CSI.

2)       Production of oxygen (get lab from me)

3)       Activity 12-1 Glencoe.

 

Complete activity 12-2 in Glencoe.

 

Complete the problem solving activity found on page 348 in Glencoe.

 

Research and describe the use of silver compounds in photography.

 

Write a newspaper article on asbestos. Research the source, composition, and properties. What properties made it suitable for use in construction in the past? How did these same properties cause asbestos to become a health hazard, and what is being done now to eliminate the hazard?

 

Plants need nitrogen compounds. Nitrogen fixing changes free nitrogen into nitrates. Lightning and legumes are both nitrogen fixing. Describe the process of nitrogen fixing. What are the causes and effects of nitrogen fixing.

 

Coinage metals got their name from their use as money, but many things have been used as money throughout time. Trace the history of money in North America from the time of Columbus.

 

Research the distribution of key metal ores around the world. Create a classroom map showing your findings.

 

Research the use of hydrogen as a nonpolluting fuel for autos, buses, and planes.

 

Research the uses of nitrogen compounds.

 

Research the long term effects of high blood pressure caused by too much sodium in the body.

 

Research industrial uses for compounds containing alkali metals.

 

Research the Hindenburg.

 

Make an illustrated timeline showing the development of fuel cells.

 

 

Each activity is 40 points:

 

Type up a formal lab report for the lab you completed.

 

Research the pros and cons of using nuclear energy to produce electricity. Present your information to include data as well as your informed opinion on the subject.

 

Take the chapter test (CSI text).

 

Take the chapter test. (Glencoe text)

 

Design and conduct an experiment about corrosion. Write a lab report.

 

References:

http://www.help4teachers.com/ScottPeriodicTable.htm

Physical Science, CSI 2001

Physical Science, Glencoe 1999

 

Check in / Daily Grade:

You can give me each activity as you finish it OR you can turn all the completed assignments in on a day of your choosing at least once per week. One weekly grade will be given per week for turning in assignments.

 

Check in 1 __________/10 points

 

Check in 2 __________/10 points

 

Check in 3 __________/10 points

 

Check in 4 __________/10 points

 

Check in 5 __________/10 points (If needed)

 








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